Thursday, August 14, 2008

Name Change, Location Change?


One year ago today the names on the Disneyland Hotel towers all changed...

Gone were the Marina, Sierra and Bonita. In their place were the Magic, Dreams and Wonder.

Gone were the last traces of Jack Wrather, the original owner of the hotel. Of course, the actual hotel is still there... and despite the memories people have of the structure, it is one of the ugliest hotels around. Both that hotel and the Paradise Pier Hotel clearly look like they weren't designed by Disney, but Wrather's hotel is especially bland.

The three concrete blocks that hold the name of the park Walt built were supposed to get a renovation that was to start almost a year ago. But the aged hotel has posed a challenge to the renovation as it might actually cost more than building a brand new hotel.

Will they or won't they? Unfortunately, the last time I talked to my Bothans there was no decision as to what to do about this abomination to architecture. Now Blue Sky would simply like to offer a couple words of advise...

Move it.

The best place to build a Disneyland Hotel is right in front of Disneyland. Or at least as close as possible. Like the Esplanade... where the transportation hub where buses, trams and taxis pull up? Imagine a lovely, themed hotel that can be seen from Harbor boulevard outside the resort. Just imagine what walking beneath this structure and coming out into the Esplanade to see Disneyland on your right and the park formerly known as Disney's California Adventure on your left?

Imagine...

12 comments:

Bothan No.1 said...

your idea sounds like crap.

developing.

Anonymous said...

Actually, we have decided to not demolish the hotel, and a major refurbishment is beginning immediately.

Anonymous said...

that is not an original idea. there have been rumors floating around about a hotel on the harbor side for a while... so honor's idea isn't "crap" it's just not original, which i think he wanted us to read between the lines in the first place.

Capt. Tomorrow said...

Like Walt, the Company needs to go against the grain and do something when it SEEMS like it is not the best time to do it. While we are in an "economic downturn" (and supposedly attendance is slowing), demolish the towers and build a hotel on the level of Tokyo Disneyland/DisneySeas. The two other Disney hotels and the partner hotels would be at capacity for the next couple of years. Yes, a couple of years. If Walt can get Disneyland built in a year and Roy can get WDW built in 2 1/2 years, surely WDC can get a hotel built in under 2 years.

Anonymous said...

While I agree that now is the time to do the work and position Disneyland Resort for the next upswing in the economy, I'm pretty opposed to this idea.

I've read about it before, and while I can relate to the benefits, I personally hate the concept.

I already hate having the Grand Californian overlooking DCA. It distracts from being in the park, and creates a feeling of "the haves and the have nots." One of the things I've loved about Disney parks is that usually they are designed that both those who can afford a great deal, and those that are on tight budgets can (seemingly at least) have a similar experience. Seeing an ornate hotel that I can't afford while in the park dispels that feeling very quickly.

Moreover, I love the open space of the Esplanade. Disneyland is cramped enough as it is without adding encroachment right outside its berm.

Just my thoughts

Brer Dan

clockworkmonkey said...

This is the second thing I've read recently implying that California Adventure might be getting a new moniker (the other being the announcement that the new Soarin' movie would be installed there as the California theme would no longer fit post-renovation). Did I miss an announcement about a new name somewhere or are we just getting these implications

Ghosthost2 said...

I don't think that this idea would be the best use of room. It's really a fairly small area that Honor is talking about. Placing the hotel in this area would limit potential expansion room for DL and DCA, and they need all the expansion room they can get.

Anonymous said...

>I already hate having the Grand Californian overlooking DCA. It distracts from being in the park, and creates a feeling of "the haves and the have nots."<

I'm trying to understand your way of thinking...do you close your eyes when a nicer car pases you on the highway? Do you expect people who choose to spend their money on nice things, to stay out of your way, as to not upset you?

Should we hide our Premium Passes while at the park? Pretend we all have day passes, as to not look pretentious?

Respectively, I think you should relax a bit and accept the realities that some people have the luxury to pay for...luxury. I say good for them.

Anonymous said...

Making the financial investment now would be great. If attendance does dip for a couple of years push people to the Paradise Pier and Grand Californian and close the Dl Hotel. Use that time to build a kick a** new resort. If they wait for the economy to pick up, vacancy will be too small (even at a substandard hotel) to warrant closing and building new.

Anonymous said...

I say, bite the bullet, tear down the DLH, and build something worthy, and fabulous. Blue Sky it till it hurts.

Anonymous said...

"Moreover, I love the open space of the Esplanade. Disneyland is cramped enough as it is without adding encroachment right outside its berm."

I don't think you read the piece fully. Honor said the best place would be where the trams and taxis are. That wouldn't take away from the Esplanade at all. It would still be there. You would enter out into it.

As for putting an overpriced hotel there? The Disneyland Hotel is already overpriced and it looks ugly. Nothing wrong with having a beautiful overpriced hotel in a better location.

Anonymous said...

Not liking that idea one bit. That close, and you have a tower visible from Tomorrowland.

Though I've always seen the current Disneyland Hotel as rather elegant in it's simplicity. The minimal Disney theming I always thought was something of an advantage. So the towers are sixties square, the decor, grounds and whatnot always had a nice feel that balanced Disneyland perfectly, without the stuffiness of the Grand Californian (which is still nice, but rather overrated). They're hardly ugly. I'd say the Paradise Pier is the blander one.

I'll be staying there come October, hoping that it's not "one last time".